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Help Desk

Problems with Cyrillic text

Most webpages include information that tell your browser which character encoding to use to display the webpage. (It you're interested in the "teckie" details of character encoding, see the section below.)

ePOSHTA is formatted as a webpage with both English and Cyrillic text. If Cyrillic text appears garbled, here are a few things to do.

First, upgrade to the laterst version of your browser--at least Internet Explorer 7 or later; Firefox 2.0 or later; Safari 3 or later. All modern browsers can display multiple languages (including Cyrillic) by detecting the character encoding specified in the webpage.

Second, while viewing ePOSHTA verify that your browser has detected the correct encoding.; that is, Unicodeá(UTF-8).


For Internet Explorer 7 or later

From the menu select:

View >> Encoding

On the fly-out menu, you should see a bullet (•) beside Unicode (UTF-8). If there is a bullet beside some other encoding, click on the Unicode (UTF-8) instead. The Cyrillic text should appear properly.


For Firefox 2 or later

From the menu select:

View >> Character Encoding

On the fly-out menu, you should see a bullet (•) beside Unicode (UTF-8). If there is a bullet beside some other encoding, click on the Unicode (UTF-8) instead. The Cyrillic text should appear properly.



"Teckie" note on document encoding in ePOSHTA

ePOSHTA is formatted as a single HTML document (i.e., webpage) and uses Unicode character encoding (charset=UTF-8) in the HTML <head> section. There are other options we could have chosen but the world is heading in the direction of Unicode.

Multilingual character coding for computers (and the web) is a fascinating topic (involving not only computer technology but politics!). There are several efforts to develop a single character coding scheme to represent ALL languages (past, present, and with the capability of expansion into the future). The most well known effort is the Unicode consortium. Another effort is the TRON Multilingual Environment. For a nice history of characters codes and where TRON fits in, see:

http://tronweb.super-nova.co.jp/characcodehist.html

You may want to read this material in small chunks--and don't get too bogged-down in the technology or the terminology. It's an interested read as a historical piece.

A comparison between Unicode and TRON can be found here.